It’s a rainy Easter Sunday. The apartment is quiet. I’m typing out this post in the kitchen, listening to a “lo-fi” Spotify playlist. The calm beats mesh well with this morning’s lazy pace. There is no rush to do anything right now.

My last post was a rushed update. I never wrote a concluding post about last Summer. I typed out multiple drafts, but never finished any of them. Time passed, and the moment to write a proper ending felt like it had passed too. It’s now the end of April 2019, and another Summer is on the horizon.

I think last Summer highlighted a lot of my strengths and weaknesses. I am able to find new opportunities quickly (as long as I keep an open mind). I am stubborn. I can be very impatient. I often start new ventures with lots of enthusiasm and effort, but get quickly demoralized whenever I don’t see results in a short period of time. I need to take better care of myself.

Despite all of the change that happened last Summer, I feel like I didn’t make a lot of progress on my goals. I think I had too many goals. I never set up proper markers to measure progress. It’s hard to feel any sense of progress if you don’t know where you’re at.

So, for this upcoming Summer, I plan to keep my goals simple (yet specific). Here’s my list (so far):

  • Ride 5000+ miles on the R3 (over the entire Summer/riding season)
    • Put new fairings on the R3
  • Run a mile in under five-minutes
  • Run five-miles daily (rest day on Sunday)
  • Earn at least one CompTIA certification
    • (Stretch goal: earn three certs)
  • Develop coding portfolio (on GitHub, personal website, etc.)
    • *At least three finished projects (by end of September)
  • Develop a weekly meal plan (in advance of the week ahead)
  • Go on four backpacking trips
    • Go on a backpacking trip in Glacier National Park
  • Read daily
    • Finish one book every 7-14 days
  • Attend Big Sky Developer Conference

There’s a lot of different things on there, and I’ll likely change this list as the Summer progresses, but I think it’s good to start with a broad list of ideas. I can always adjust this as time goes on.

As for this blog, my goal is to post an update at least once a week (every Sunday around 11 AM).

I’m excited for the Summer ahead, and I can’t wait to bring you along for the journey. I’ll post more updates before Summer “officially” begins in June.

Until next time,

-Will

Revival

…and just like that, the long dead blog I forgot about for the past three-years came back to life.

Welcome back to The Final Summer: a seasonal daily blog where I write about the events of the day, my interests and aspirations, and a myriad of other things (including original writing pieces and photography). This blog has over 100 posts from previous active years (the blog was primarily active during 2010; the most recent post before this one was written in 2014), which should give you a decent sampling of what this year’s run will look like. I plan on being markedly more consistent this year than my last few attempts.

Now that the introduction is out of the way, let’s dive into a brief recap & today’s post:

SINCE THE LAST POST….

  • I quit my job at the hardware store last summer. I now work at a guitar factory. Today was actually my one-year anniversary there. I have mixed feelings about my “new” job, but it’s better than my old one (I never got a free guitar from my old job).
  • I bought a motorcycle early last year. The picture you see in the header is one that I took whilst on a group ride with some friends. Owning and riding a motorcycle on the street has been an extremely rewarding experience so far. It’s an experience that requires your mind to be completely focused on the present. The result is complete liberation of the conscience– a kind of temporary bliss that you never want to give up. I racked up around 5000 miles on the bike last year alone, and I hope to ride more than that this year.
  • I’m still living in Bozeman. I’m still single. I’m still OK with all that (though I hope to move somewhere else by next year– more on this later).

As I mentioned above, today marked my one year anniversary at the guitar factory. Working at this job has been an interesting experience (and an incredibly mundane, brain-atrophying one as well). I get to work on guitars that cost thousands of dollars, and are considered by some to be the best in the world. I enjoyed wood shop class in high school, so getting to work in a similar environment is kind of neat (though not something I would have ever expected to do back then). While the job is incredibly repetitive, I have the freedom to listen to whatever music, podcasts, and/or audio-books that I want to while I’m working (which does help to counteract the mind-numbing labor).

I feel that working there is holding me back, though. I currently work an evening shift during the weekdays, and this prevents me from meeting new people, as most folks work during the day. The work itself also isn’t very personally satisfying, and I often wish that I was working somewhere that took advantage of my talents. All that being said, I am still thankful to simply have a job, and I don’t think that I’m above working there (or whatever other conceited notion my previous comments may have implied). There is a certain satisfaction that comes with doing an honest day’s work, and I often feel like I’ve worked my ass off at the end of the day. My hands take the brunt of the abuse, and I can feel the carpal tunnel setting in at the end of each shift.

As a writer, this is particularly concerning (for obvious reasons).

It also makes it difficult to play guitar (ironic, eh?).

Outside of work, I haven’t done much today. This job is also the perfect crutch for my night owl tendencies– another reason to get a day job. It’ll take a few days to get back into the groove of blogging, and I promise that future posts will be more interesting than this one.

See you tomorrow,

-Will